SnapLogic Extends Data Integration Capabilities for Citizen Devs

Enhancements to Iris AI-Powered Integration Assistant are designed to shorten the "citizen integrator" learning curve.

SnapLogic

SnapLogic, which specializes in a hard-to-do-well segment--self-service application and data integration--has unveiled its fall 2017 product release.

The San Mateo, Calif.-based company, housed safely in Gartner’s 2017 Magic Quadrant for Enterprise Integration as a Platform, added improvements to its Enterprise Integration Cloud that include new and updated pre-built intelligent connectors, called Snaps. These enable users to more quickly and easily integrate a wider range of big data sources and analytics tools.

The company also added a new Microsoft Dynamics AX Snap Pack to make it easier to integrate Microsoft products across the enterprise. These new features in the SnapLogic Integration Assistant are designed to accelerate user productivity and time-to-integration, the company said.

These tools fit nicely into the current trend toward so-called citizen development, or low- and no-code application development. This is all about non-IT, line-of-business employees doing their own application building or augmentation using familiar tools and cloud services. eWEEK has covered this major trend closely this year. 

Here is a roundup of the new features:

New Snaps: The new Amazon DynamoDB Query Snap makes it easier for users to retrieve data from the popular NoSQL database. Two new Snaps for Google BigQuery Bulk Load simplify cloud storage and data streaming. The new PySpark Snap supports big data and analytics capabilities.

Added Microsoft Support: The Fall 2017 release also includes additional connectivity support for Microsoft environments. A new Microsoft Dynamics AX Snap Pack enables users to easily move data to and from Microsoft’s integrated suite of ERP solutions. This capability ensures full visibility and optimization of business operations. This latest addition builds on SnapLogic’s previous support for Microsoft Azure Data Lake Store, Microsoft Cortana Analytics Suite, and Microsoft Dynamics 365 CRM.

AI-Powered Assistance: The SnapLogic Integration Assistant, a key addition in the company’s Iris AI initiative, has received additional enhancements. In the previous version, Integration Assistant provided users with Snap recommendations after they selected the first step in an integration project. Now, users faced with uncertainty over where to begin building integration pipelines can use the assistant to suggest the first Snap through last Snaps needed to complete pipelines.

The Integration Assistant uses machine learning to make this first-Snap recommendation based on the platform’s knowledge of a customer’s application landscape and successful pipelines executed by other integrators within the company. With this additional assistance, citizen integrators can shorten their integration pipeline learning curve, gain greater confidence in their pipeline building skills, and drive more self-service integration projects.

Interface Updates: To further improve the user experience, SnapLogic has added updates that simplify the user interface. For example, a new Error Pipeline feature ensures that all errors are captured and consolidated off the design canvas and in the platform’s monitoring dashboard. This simplifies the user interface and makes it easier for integrators to visualize their pipelines. A new Dynamic Validation feature allows users to change expressions and view transformations of pipelines in real-time, improving productivity for users working on complex expressions.

SnapLogic counts among its customers Adobe, AstraZeneca, Box, GameStop, Verizon and Wendy’s, which use SnapLogic to automate business processes, accelerate analytics and drive digital transformation.

For more information about the fall 2017 release (V4.11), go here.

Chris Preimesberger

Chris J. Preimesberger

Chris J. Preimesberger is Editor of Features & Analysis at eWEEK, responsible in large part for the publication's coverage areas. In his 12 years and more than 3,900 stories at eWEEK, he...